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Mulberry School for Girls Pupil Premium Impact Report

Autumn 2017

The Pupil Premium is additional funding for publicly-funded schools in England to raise the attainment of disadvantaged students and close the gap between them and their peers. At Mulberry, the Pupil Premium is used to provide targeted enrichment and support for groups of students who need different types of intervention so that they can engage with the school’s aims effectively. (See the separate document “Case Study: Effective Use of the Pupil Premium” for the scope of our intervention.)

Mulberry had 771 students eligible for Pupil Premium in the 2016-17 financial year (55% of the whole school cohort, and 64% of the Year 11 cohort). 29% of students nationally are eligible.

This report presents the impact of our use of this funding, evidenced in exam outcomes, progress data, attendance data, and other indicators where relevant. The report looks separately at the impact on 2017 outcomes, on progress of the current Y11 and the current Y7-10.

Headlines

-The progression rate to university, and to Russell Group universities, is significantly higher for disadvantaged students at Mulberry than for non-disadvantaged students nationally (school and national data)

-In 2017, Y11 disadvantaged students made more progress than non-disadvantaged students (P8 score of 0.8 for disadvantaged students compared to 0.7 for all students)

-In 2017 in English, maths, EBacc and Open subjects Y11 disadvantaged students made more progress than non-disadvantaged students

-In 2017, overall, and in English, EBacc and Open subjects, attainment was higher for disadvantaged students compared to other students nationally. Attainment for disadvantaged students in maths was in line with attainment for all students nationally in maths

-Specific interventions have had a measurable impact on progress and attendance. Beyond this, evaluations show the value students place on the additional support and opportunities.

-In totality, Mulberry’s provision for disadvantaged students is accelerating their progress and participation significantly, compared to their peers nationally.

 2017 outcomes

Cohort 

Total

PP

SEN

PP and SEN

205

71%

13%

10%

 

Progress and attainment

2017

PP

Difference between disadvantaged at Mulberry and non

Difference between Mulberry disadvantaged and ‘other’   nationally

Progress 8

0.77

+0.32

+0.67

Attainment 8

54

-4

+5

English and Maths 5+

49%

-14%

0

Ebacc grade 5+

44%

-16%

+19%

Entering EBacc

84%

-4%

+41%

 

Disadvantaged students in Year 11 in 2017 made considerably more progress than non-disadvantaged students at Mulberry School.

Disadvantaged students outperformed their ‘other’ peers nationally on almost all measures. This is demonstrated in the higher progress and attainment compared to ‘other’ students nationally which was seen in almost all areas including English, EBacc and Open subjects. In maths, attainment was in line with ‘other’ students nationally.

Disadvantaged students in the 2017 Year 11 cohort had significantly lower starting points than their non-disadvantaged peers; the attainment of PP students was lower than these peers however it represented much greater progress from their starting points compared to non-disadvantaged students at Mulberry School.

Attendance

2017

PP

Difference between disadvantaged at Mulberry and non

Difference between Mulberry disadvantaged and ‘other’   nationally

Absence

3.8%

+0.5%

-0.4%

Persistent absentees

7%

+3.1%

-1.5%

 

Absence and persistent absenteeism is lower for Mulberry’s disadvantaged students than non-disadvantaged students nationally. Mulberry’s gap between disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged for absence is significantly lower than the national gap. Specific targeted interventions have raised attendance for pupil premium students; this includes the work of the Attendance and Welfare Officer, the Home School liaison officer and an Inclusion Co-ordinator.

Exclusions

This data is for the 2015/16 academic year

2016

PP

Difference between disadvantaged at Mulberry and non

Difference between Mulberry disadvantaged and ‘other’   nationally

Permanent exclusions

0

0

-0.08%

Fixed period exclusions

5%

+1%

0

Exclusion for Mulberry’s disadvantaged students is either in line, with or lower than, non-disadvantaged students nationally. It is lower than girls nationally. Mulberry’s gap between disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged on all indicators is significantly lower than the national gap. Specific targeted interventions have led to a very small number of exclusions for pupil premium students, and no gap between PP students at Mulberry and ‘other’ students nationally; this includes the work of the Inclusion Co-ordinator, Learning Mentors, a School Counsellor and Academic Mentors.

Progression

This data is for the 2015/16 academic year 

2016

PP

Difference between disadvantaged at Mulberry and non

Difference between Mulberry disadvantaged and ‘other’   nationally

Percentage of students staying in education or entering   employment after KS4

99%

0

+3%

The progression rate of students to further education or employment was exactly the same for both disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged students at Mulberry School in this year. The progression of disadvantaged students at Mulberry was higher than non-disadvantaged students nationally. Specific and targeted intervention designed to support progression for pupil premium students has included Academic Mentors and a Raising Standards team, focused on both raising attainment and supporting successful progression.

Progression to university (2015 cohort)

2015 cohort

PP

Difference between disadvantaged at Mulberry and ‘other’   students nationally

Progression to HE

75%

+23%

Progression to Russell Group HE

31%

+18%

The progression to university of disadvantaged students at Mulberry is significantly higher than progression of other students nationally. This is the case for both progression to Higher Education and for progression to Russell Group universities specifically. Comprehensive support for pupil premium students, in both academic and pastoral areas, has enabled this very high university and Russell Group progression.

Impact for the current Year 11

Cohort

Total

PP

SEN

PP and SEN

209

62%

17%

9%

 Progress and attainment (based on prediction 1)

2017

PP

Difference between disadvantaged at Mulberry and non

Progress 8

0.44

-0.05

Attainment 8

4.95

-0.12

English and Maths 5+

58%

-1%

Ebacc APS

4.64

-0.11

Entering EBacc

88%

+3%

The predicted gap between pupil premium and non at Mulberry School is predicted to be very low in 2018, with the attainment gap in 2018 predicted to be lower than that in 2017. Pupil premium students at Mulberry are already predicted to demonstrate better progress and attainment than ‘other’ students nationally did in 2017. It is likely that pupil premium students at Mulberry will again outperform ‘other’ students nationally in all areas in 2018.

Attendance

2017

PP

Difference between disadvantaged at Mulberry and non

Absence

4.3%

+0.5%

Persistent absentees

8%

+2%

Absence and persistent absenteeism for Year 11 in 2017 was lower for Mulberry’s disadvantaged students than non-disadvantaged students nationally. Absence and persistent absentees are both lower for pupil premium students in the current Year 11 than they were nationally in 2015-16. Specific targeted interventions have raised attendance for pupil premium students; this includes the work of the Attendance and Welfare Officer, the Home School liaison officer and an Inclusion Co-ordinator.

Progress and attendance data are not wholly relevant to all the funded provisions. Separate evaluations showing a wider range of indicators are available for each provision:

“Prep helps me avoid distractions at home. “

“At home no one is there to help but in Prep Miss helps us.”

 “I learned things I didn’t know before in Intervention.” 

 “Our teachers are there and they focus exactly on what we don’t understand” (Intervention)

 “I liked the way she explained things to me – it really made me understand”(Social Worker)

 “I felt good because I’m sorting my life out – I’m making my life happy whenever I come here.” (SW)

 “I was able to discuss my worries with my mentor which reduced some stress” (Learning mentor)

 “I was able to focus more in lessons” (Star Academy)

 “I needed the push and pull from my mentor” (Star Academy)

 “I was able to talk about anything and everything – especially uncomfortable thoughts” (counsellor)

 “It helped me understand myself and others” (counsellor)

Impact for Year 7 – 10 (in 2016-17)

Year

Total

PP

SEN

7

209

56%

12%

8

210

58%

15%

9

209

64%

10%

10

210

69%

17%

 Progress and attainment

2016-17 year

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Indicator

PP

PP/ non gap

PP

PP/non gap

PP

PP/non gap

Average grade from target in maths*

-2.7

-0.3

-1.3

-0.1

-1.5

-0.1

Average grade from target in English*

-2.3

-0.3

-1.2

0

-1

+0.1

% of students on or above target across all subjects

22

-1%

33

0

34

-1%

 *This data is based on Mulberry School target grades, which are set very high and designed to support students to make progress that would leave them 1.2 grades above national average by the end of Key Stage 4. This data shows that overall, the pupil premium progress gap decreases as students move through the school. Pupil premium spending is targeted on specific provisions that ensure this is the case.

Year 10 Autumn 2017 

Autumn 2017

PP

Difference between disadvantaged at Mulberry and non

Progress 8

-0.9

0

Attainment 8

3.82

-0.08

English and Maths 5+

11%

-3%

Ebacc APS

3.4

-0.1

Again, progress and attendance data are not wholly relevant to all the funded provisions. Separate evaluations showing a wider range of indicators are available for each provision:

“I was more in control because I was getting my work done during the sessions” (Prep)

“If I was absent for a class, it allowed me to catch up.” (Prep)

“We get to do more practice and to learn things in different ways. I am better at maths when I’m back in my own class” (Study Plus)

“Study Plus makes sure we all understand everything”

“She’s an expert on the subject - I understand much more about my situation now” (Social Worker)

“It’s a stress-free place – I liked just talking about things” (counsellor)

“Now I know how to talk and behave with people” (learning mentor)

“I have learnt that I can overcome difficulties myself” (learning mentor)

“My mentor helped me realise that my disability isn’t something to be afraid of” (learning mentor)

 2017-18 focus areas

Last year’s report suggested the following areas for action over 2016-17

-ensure tracking systems for these provisions include UPN and FSM eligibility information;

This has now been set up and is in place.

-engage maths and English leaders and teachers in overcoming any particular blocks to progress for disadvantaged students.

This is ongoing, however there has been considerable initial success, with disadvantaged students in maths and English in Year 11 in 2017 making more progress than their non-disadvantaged peers.

-review the detailed evaluations for each provision to determine impact beyond the achievement and attendance indicators presented here; determine where to target funding in the coming year;

This is ongoing.

2017-18 focus areas

-Ensure that there continues to be no disadvantage gap in terms of the progress made by students through Key Stage 3 and 4. This has been significantly reduced or closed in several areas, however there remains some inconsistency between subject areas and across year groups which needs to be addressed

-Use new tracking systems to regularly review and evaluate the impact of specific provision on progress, attainment and attendance of pupil premium students, to determine where to target funding in the coming year. Ensure that this is done on an ongoing basis.

-Further review evaluations for each provision to determine impact beyond achievement and attendance

The next pupil premium strategy review will be held in September 2018.